Stereotypes

WE ARE ALL A SOME KIND OF A STEREOTYPE!

The origin of the word stereotype comes from the French word stéréotype, here does stéréo-, from the Greek word stereo together with the word type from the Late Latin word typus. A stereotype is “…a fixed, over generalized belief about a particular group or class of people.” (Cardwell, 1996). That was the topic of our last  last CTS lesson, we talked about which stereotypes we know, if we were accosted with a stereotype in the past and if we think if it is something positive or negative.

Stereotypes influence our daily lives everyday, we judge people based on their gender, culture or group they belong to (for example age group) and to draw our conclusions from things we do not actually know about. ‘Typical’ stereotypes for,

GENDER ARE:

  • Men are strong and because of this they do all the work.
  • Men are the “backbone” of a family
  • Women are not as smart as a man.
  • Women can not do a job as good as a man.
  • The women is at home with the children while the man works

CULTURE ARE:

  • All Jews are greedy from nature.
  • All Asians are good at math and eat rice to every meal.
  • All Irish people are alcoholics.

GROUP ARE:

  • All blonds are unintelligent.
  • All teenagers are rebels and do not go to school.
  • All children hate healthy food.

The problem with the term stereotype is that we associate it with something negative, yet is stereotyping nothing else than labeling or naming things. It is the nature of the human being to name the unnamed and this is totally ‘okay’, as long as no one gets hurt.
‘Naming is the act of best knowing a name, of labeling, of creating an identity. It is a means of structuring reality. It imposes pattern on the world that is meaningful in the namer’ (Hope A. Olson, 2002, the power to name).

After  talking about different types of stereotypes we got the task to draw some of them here are some examples:

mYmh07Js

 

UbJgKF9J

Read more at http://examples.yourdictionary.com/stereotype-examples.html#ccd6YHRTa4SZKAZ1.99

Cardwell, M. (1996). Dictionary of Psychology. Chicago IL: Fitzroy Dearborn.

Katz, D., & Braly, K. (1933). Racial stereotypes of one hundred college students. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 28, 280-290.

http://www.simplypsychology.org/katz-braly.html

dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/stereotype

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s